{7QT} lessons learned limiting social media

Once you get alliteration in your head, it is futile to try to stop it. Unwritten rules. I pinky-promise.

A few weeks back I wrote about how I had deactivated my Facebook page for the month of August. I have been back on for almost a month and now seemed like a good time for a little update, quick-takes style.

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{One}

No matter how much I never want to admit it, constant social media use totally causes anxiety. I felt relief almost the hour I deactivated. Instant peace. I didn’t have that addict-like nag in the back of my head, prodding me to just see what is happening on Facebook. FOMO is a real thing, y’all.

{Two}

Being on Facebook makes me cranky. This is partially because I get absorbed in TheScroll and heaven help the spouse or child that interrupts. But, it is also because I cannot seem to let someone be wrong on the internet.

{Three}

I don’t actually miss anything from not being on Facebook. All of the things that I am looking at all the live-long day, they aren’t really bits of information I need in my life. Now, I do have several, very real, online friendships with Catholic women across the country, and I do in fact miss them and their virtual companionship. But most of the time I spend on Facebook is not spent cultivating relationships.

{Four}

Wasting time isn’t strictly a Facebook problem for me, it is an Amanda problem. It doesn’t really matter if I am on Facebook or not, I will find creative new ways to waste my time. I had hoped I would be so productive, plowing through my reading lists and churning out piece after piece of writing. Nope. It is my personality that needs some fine-tuning. However, no other medium allows me to waste my time with such ease as Facebook.

{Five}

Since coming back on I am more intentional with what a post and what I let be special memories just for me and my family. That is a really nice takeaway for me, so if that is the only thing to come from the Great Facebook Detox, so be it.

{Six}

I still need to set limits. I knew right away that I should only access Facebook from my laptop as the device itself forces you to be more intentional. I did not stick to that resolution, however. I know. I am going to make Facebook fasts a regular part of my life, though. Maybe I won’t need to deactivate next time?

And, maybe I will only use my laptop for Facebook. Maybe.

{Seven}

Facebook isn’t all bad. I already mentioned the lovely community of women I have on Facebook, but, I also have a wonderful Book Club on Facebook! I co-lead with Michele Faehnle and Emily Jaminet. The group has over 1000 members and tomorrow we are starting our discussion of Haley Stewart‘s book The Grace of Enough.  Join us, whether you have read the book yet or not- we are discussing the introduction tomorrow and there is still time for you to order the book before we dive in to the first two chapters.

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Linking up with Kelly.

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